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"Mr. Jim Clark was my point of contact with Champion; he was courteous, professional and extremely helpful. It was a pleasure doing business with him. The members of all of the crews, water removal/drying, carpet layers and packers were courteous, professional, arrived on time, and completed work in a timely manner. In addition, they were friendly. We are very pleased with Champion's response and work and I will gladly recommend Champion to others. I will express my satisfaction with Champion to USAA." - Water Damage in Fayetteville, GA

"I have never been as impressed with a great group of young men. Very professional, efficient and knowledgeable of their line of work. Considering the age of my crew; they out-performed the middle and older aged men I have worked with in similar job requests. Thank you!!! Big kudos to Colby...loved this kid!!!" - Water Damage in Ellenwood, GA

"The crew was super courteous and professional. They also showed a level of compassion that was an unexpected surprise. They also took the extra step to explain every step." - Water Damage in Jonesboro, GA

"If I hadn't seen the damage beforehand, afterwards I wouldn't have know it had occurred. Great group of people both repairing and managing the crews." - Water Damage in Peachtree City, GA

“Champion has done a super job in getting the house squared away. All of their employees and subcontractors have been professional, courteous and helpful in answering our many questions and keeping us informed of schedules and other matters.” - Fire Damage in Peachtree City, GA

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS > Water Damage Questions > What are the water damage categories?

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According to the IICRC Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Water Damage Restoration (IICRC S500), there are three categories of water that cause damage in buildings. They are summarized as follows:

Category 1 Water

– That which is clean at the releasing source and does not pose a hazard if consumed by humans. Category 1 water may become progressively contaminated as it mixes with soils on or within floor coverings or building assemblies (walls, decking, subflooring). Time and temperature, which promote the growth and amplification of microorganisms in water can cause Category 1 water to degrade. Examples: burst water pipes, failed supply lines on appliances, vertically falling rainwater.

Category 2 Water

– That which begins with some degree of contamination and could cause sickness or discomfort if consumed by humans. As with Category 1 water, time and temperature can cause Category 2 water to become progressively more contaminated.

Category 3 Water

– That which is highly contaminated and could cause death or serious illness if consumed by humans. Examples: sewage, rising flood water from rivers and streams, ground surface water flowing horizontally into homes. There are two ways in which water enters a building as a result of wind storm damage: The first involves falling or windblown rainwater that enters as a result of damage to roof components or wall assemblies. The second involves horizontally traveling ground surface water (Category 3) containing silt and soil contaminants that infiltrate into structures, generally through doors or around foundation walls. This ground surface water (storm surge) may accumulate to a depth of several inches or several feet. When structures are partially submerged or remain substantially flooded for weeks, far more elaborate procedures usually are required. Most household microorganisms (fungi, bacteria) typically require five conditions for germination, growth, amplification and dissemination. Generally, they include:

  • organic food source, especially cellulose (e.g., paper, wood), which are found in abundance in construction materials
  • moisture, even high humidity (67% RH plus)
  • moderate temperature - 68-86°F/20-30°C
  • stagnant air
  • time – several hours to several days


Anything that can be done to control or minimize these optimum conditions will prolong the time required for microbial growth.

Last updated on November 8, 2011 by Champion